FAQs

When you start digging into the Bible, you’ll often end up with questions that don’t have obvious answers. Don’t worry, it’s normal! The culture and languages of the Bible were very different than our modern world. Without context — understanding common terminology and practices of the times — it’s almost impossible to understand what a particular Scripture is trying to say. This page will help give you some of that context.

The written and video answers below are provided by people who have made it their life’s work to understand the life and times of the Bible. They study ancient biblical manuscripts and non-biblical historical records you’ve probably never heard of.

Ironically, it’s these extra-biblical texts that often provide a simple key to unlock a complicated Bible question.

Search for your answer below. If you don’t see what you need, click here to ask your question; we’ll get our experts on it right away!

What is a rude awakening?

A Rude Awakening (Ā – ‘rüd – a – ‘wā – kĕn – ing) phrase – 1 :a misspelling of the popular term “A Rood Awakening,” coined in reference to seminars by Michael Rood that expose pagan practices that predate the tower of Babel and have now infiltrated religions the world over:

These seminars, dubbed “A Rood Awakening” for their hard-hitting but fascinating flood of information, were turned into a television series filmed in the land of Israel. The television series takes audiences to the very locations where the most significant biblical events took place and teaches the truth of scripture without the man-made traditions that confuse and misdirect.

Examples of A ROOD AWAKENING:

It was quite A Rood Awakening to find out the truth about Christian holidays.

The pastor had A Rood Awakening when he learned what Matthew 23 was really about.

When the Red Sea crossing site was discovered, it was truly A Rood Awakening!

First known use of A ROOD AWAKENING:

1996

Rhymes with A ROOD AWAKENING:

  • A brewed awakening
  • A food awakening
What does it mean to afflict ones soul as in Leviticus 23:27?

To “afflict one’s soul” means to fast from all food and drink, even water, from sundown on the ninth day of the seventh month (the eve of the Day of Atonement) until sundown on the tenth day. Children, pregnant women, the elderly, and people suffering from chronic illnesses do not usually fast, although many do. Some will fast from food but will drink. All forms of work are forbidden on the Day of Atonement, including cooking.

Following are some Scripture verses that speak about afflicting one’s soul.

Psalm 35:13 But as for me, when they were sick, my clothing was sackcloth, I afflicted (KJV humbled) my soul with fasting; and my prayer, may it return into mine own bosom.

Psalm 69:10 When I wept, and chastened my soul with fasting, that was to my reproach.

Isaiah 58:3 Wherefore have we fasted, say they, and thou seest not? wherefore have we afflicted our soul, and thou takest no knowledge? …

Isaiah 58:5 Is it such a fast that I have chosen? a day for a man to afflict his soul? …

Isaiah 58:10 And if thou draw out thy soul to the hungry, and satisfy the afflicted soul; then shall thy light rise in obscurity, and thy darkness be as the noonday.

For a deeper understanding of the spring and fall Feasts, I highly recommend Michael’s teachings Prophecies in the SPRING and FALL Feasts of the LORD for a wealth of information on the Feasts and so much more.

Batya Wootten’s book, Israel’s Feasts and Their Fullness: Expanded Edition, is available here: http://bookstore.aroodawakening.tv/products/israel-s-feasts-and-their-fullness-expanded-edition

Where can I buy the clothes you wear on your television program?

First, let me make the distinction that I do not mow the lawn in my ancient Biblical garments. I dress in typical Israelite garb of the first century in order to help people make a 2000 year mental leap, back to the land, the language, and the culture in which the first century Jewish followers of the Messiah lived. I have my white linen haluq made for me in the Old City of Jerusalem by my friend Sami Barsom, who is the Muhktar of the Syrian Orthodox community.  My talit was hand-woven for me by Anita Heist and is one-of-a-kind.  Every time I put on that beautiful talit, I am reminded of Yahshua’s four cornered seamless garment for which the Roman soldiers cast lots. 

In my original series Prepare for a Rood Awakening from Israel, my Biblical garments were provided by Beged Ivrit of Jerusalem, a Levitical/Biblical garment restoration project headed by Reuven Prager.  

As my Jerusalem tailor is officially retired, now I have my white linen haluq (or jalibea in Arabic) made by MicroTalit of Israel, which produces some of the finest ancient and modern Biblical garments available, as well as the full-sized talit that I wear on my television programs, the shorter tunic (shirt-type) talit, and the MicroTalits that I wear on an everyday basis with my dress slacks or jeans (while I’m actually mowing the lawn).  The sartorial finery of MicroTalit of Israel is soon to be displayed on our website for all to enjoy and purchase for themselves.  

 

Are women meant to wear head coverings all the time or only in worship and prayer?

There is no commandment concerning women wearing head coverings and the reference to head coverings in Shaul’s letter to the Corinthians is not what it has been twisted to mean. You will want to watch the video teaching “Who is your Unauthorized Covering” for a full understanding of this topic.

What version of the scriptures do you recommend?

My favorite English version of the Bible is and always will be the Authorized King James Version that I grew up with. Even though some English words now mean almost exactly the opposite of what they did in 1611, the vast majority of lexicons, concordances and linguistic study aids that have been produced in the English language have been based on the KJV. So, a direct line back to the more original texts is greatly simplified by sticking with a version that has been under the microscope for over four hundred years. My favorite “New Testament” is the Greek Interlinear, which supplies a word-by-word translation of the Greek, but also gives me access to nearly 5000 extant manuscripts where there are any significant variations.

We offer two good alternatives to the King James available on our website.  Both leave behind the archaic Elizabethan English forms that tend confuse modern readers. The Scriptures was produced by an editorial team in South Africa. The Word of Yahweh was produced by an editorial team in the U.S.  Both are worthy for reading if not serious lexical analysis.

The Complete Jewish Bible is a commendable attempt to make the Scriptures, including the “New Testament”, more palatable for Jewish readers.  My daughters all enjoyed this version in their younger years.  However, due to the rabbinic “leaven” interpolated into this version of the Gospel records, I find this version too whimsical for my taste.

There is not now, nor will there ever be, a perfect translation of either the Hebrew or Greek manuscripts. One of the best examples of the difficulty of translating Hebrew into English is found in Episode 5 – The Hem of His Garment, in which I spend a half hour defining what the phrase “hem of His garment” actually means.  It takes an understanding of not only the language, but the culture, history, and commandments that were given to the ancient Israelites.  Without that background, it is impossible to understand those four simple English words in the New Testament.

For those who are interested in the Creator’s reckoning of time, you will find a fascinating 2-hour adventure into the ancient Hebrew word aviv as it is defined in the DVD series Volume 14 - The Creator’s Calendar and the Restoration of All Things.  The King James translators redefined abib several different ways in 1611, yet it took nearly 15 years for Hebrew scholars to accurately define the term aviv in this generation.

Where can I buy the clothes you wear on your television program?

First, let me make the distinction that I do not mow the lawn in my ancient Biblical garments. I dress in typical Israelite garb of the first century in order to help people make a 2000 year mental leap, back to the land, the language, and the culture in which the first century Jewish followers of the Messiah lived. I have my white linen haluq made for me in the Old City of Jerusalem by my friend Sami Barsom, who is the Muhktar of the Syrian Orthodox community.  My talit was hand-woven for me by Anita Heist and is one-of-a-kind.  Every time I put on that beautiful talit, I am reminded of Yahshua’s four cornered seamless garment for which the Roman soldiers cast lots. 

In my original series Prepare for a Rood Awakening from Israel, my Biblical garments were provided by Beged Ivrit of Jerusalem, a Levitical/Biblical garment restoration project headed by Reuven Prager.  

As my Jerusalem tailor is officially retired, now I have my white linen haluq (or jalibea in Arabic) made by MicroTalit of Israel, which produces some of the finest ancient and modern Biblical garments available, as well as the full-sized talit that I wear on my television programs, the shorter tunic (shirt-type) talit, and the MicroTalits that I wear on an everyday basis with my dress slacks or jeans (while I’m actually mowing the lawn).  The sartorial finery of MicroTalit of Israel is soon to be displayed on our website for all to enjoy and purchase for themselves.  

Is is okay for a woman to wear tzit tzit on the belt loops of her jeans?

The tzit tzit were originally part of a traditional four-cornered garment worn by the Israelites. After the Roman dispersion, the outward symbol of being Torah observant was no longer displayed on an outer garment, and the tallit was transformed into a prayer shawl commonly known as the tallit gadol. A smaller four cornered garment called the tallit katan, was typically worn under other garments but did have the tzit tzit on the four corners. Since four-cornered garments are not common in most of the world today, many have adapted the tzit tzit to articles of modern dress. Wearing tzit tzit on the belt loops appears to have “caught on” here in the western predominantly Gentile world and is certainly a novel modern adaptation of the use of tzit tzit -to remind us to keep the commandments and to spark the questioning minds of innocent bystanders. We prefer another innovation on the theme of the tallit, which has been named the micro tallit. It is a four-cornered garment that is worn over the belt and even qualifies as a four-cornered garment according to rabbinic specifications. The problem is one must wear a belt in order to wear a micro tallit, but that should be no problem for someone who is tying tzit tzit to their belt loops. The micro tallit is at home with casual jeans but can also dress up a formal tuxedo at any black tie gala you may be attending. The micro tallit is all the rage in Israel today and is making its way around the globe. You may want to check out our selection here.

The only germaine instruction that we have concerning women wearing a tallit is that women are not to wear men’s clothes and men are not to dress in women’s clothes. Even though women were wearing pants while men were still wearing jalobeas, pants are no longer considered exclusively women’s attire and jeans have made the cross-gender leap. Tzit tzit are not gender specific and the only requirement is that they have a blue thread, which reminds us of the sapphire blue floor in the throneroom of the Almighty. The color of the other threads was never specified.  In Israel the tallits for women are obviously feminine in their design to avoid any confusion between men’s and women’s clothing.

For more information about tzit tzits and the blue thread, watch episode 5 ”The Hem of the Garment”.

Are we to celebrate Hanukkah instead of Christmas?

I will answer that question with a question posed in Sheldon’s book In His Steps: WWJD?  Or perhaps more accurately, What Did Yahshua Do?

Two months after making a belated appearance at the Feast of Tabernacles because of the Pharisees’ stated intention to kill him the next time he showed up in Jerusalem, Yahshua returned to Jerusalem in the month of December for the Feast of Dedication (Hanukkah).  Even in the face of death threats, Yahshua did not miss the opportunity to celebrate the winter festival that commemorates our deliverance from the pagan sun-god worshipping Greek heathens after they had erected an image of Zeus on the Temple Mount, declaring Zeus to be God on his birthday, December 25th.

The reason that modern Christians know nothing about the Feast of Hanukkah or its prophetic import for the last days is because the book of Maccabees was removed from the original 1611 KJV by the American and British Bible Societies in the early 1800s.  After Maccabees was expunged from the Biblical record, much of the context of the Gospel record was lost.  Only the Jews were celebrating Hanukkah, but they had added so many modern rabbinic inventions that it was almost stripped of its original significance.

Yes, we should be celebrating Hanukkah, and recognizing what Yahshua did and taught at that festival.  What better time of year to celebrate cleansing the “Temple” of the vestiges of paganism than the very time when we are most surrounded by its most blatant examples?  What has turned into the “Jewish Christmas” was originally the “Anti-Xmas,” and is properly celebrated as such today.  My 1.5 hour cd Hockin’ a Chanak on Hanukkah and the King James Version of the Apocrypha are in our bookstore (available separately or bundled together) so that you can get a full understanding of the significance of Hanukkah and its modern-day perversions in both the Christian and Jewish cultures.

What are the Biblical requirements for mikveh regarding the water used and the need for witnesses?

In Shaul’s letter to the Messianic Hebrews he states that the doctrine of “baptism(s)” (or mikvaot in Hebrew) is one of the foundations of our faith in Messiah. The term mikveh refers to “running or living water.” The symbolism indicates that our sins are being washed away and carried away forever. A large natural lake or stream has always been appropriate, but most of the mikvaot used during the early synagogue period were manmade and the rabbis developed several criterion and mechanical means whereby a manmade mikveh could become “living water.”

The mikveh was most often done in private with no witnesses present. When done as a declaration of faith and identification with Messiah it is much more common to follow the tradition of Yochanan Ben Zachariah and have a public mikveh .

In my 1.5 hour teaching on The Mikveh – The Doctrine of Baptisms I detail the many “baptisms” referred to in the Brit Chadasha and their relevance to us today, which will be a great benefit to those who want to understand the depth of this practice, which is well over 3000 years old.

Does John contradict Luke regarding whether the Last Supper was the Passover meal?

The Gospel of Luke does not contradict the Gospel of John, nor is there any contradiction between any of the Gospels. Each gospel record paints a different facet of the Messiah’s life and ministry. Only by superimposing each gospel record over the other and synchronizing them with the instructions in the Torah do you get the full five-dimensional picture of the Messiah as He walked among men. All apparent contradictions lie either in our understanding or our interpretation. In the case of the apparent contradiction between Luke and John concerning the Last Supper, it is a combination of both.

It took me 70 hours of teaching to fully answer this question.  You can get the abbreviated version in the 10-hour DVD series Volume 16 - The Jonah Code and the 70 Weeks Prophecy of Daniel. This series details the events surrounding the Last Supper, which was NOT the Passover meal, no matter how badly some people want it to be. Unless we get this detail correct, we will never be able to solve the Jonah Code, which is the “one sign” that authenticates Yahshua as the Messiah: three days and three nights in the grave, and yet raised on the third day. This detail is ignored by most because of their infatuation with Nimrod’s reincarnated wife, the sex goddess Easter.

How does one remember the Sabbath and keep it holy?

Unlike some commandments which can only be “kept” while living in the Promised Land, the commandment to remember the Sabbath day and to keep it holy is a commandment with no geographic boundaries.  Keeping the Sabbath in the land of Israel (where the vast majority of the culture diligently “remembers” and does their best to “keep” the Sabbath) is much easier than it is while we are living among the heathen in exile. In my experience, learning how to remember and keep the Sabbath day holy is a lifelong journey, the perfection of which I am not likely to accurately define. Recognizing that the Sabbath is the day that our Creator set aside for us to commune with Him and rest in Him, remembering the Sabbath day and keeping it holy is more of a pursuit than an accomplishment.

How do we have a restful Shabbat while traveling miles to a fellowship or being a part of a large celebration like you put on for the feasts?

Shabbat is the busiest day in the temple service – but the priesthood was on a rotating schedule so that they were not working to exhaustion every Sabbath but just twice a year plus the feast days. Rest doesn’t mean idleness, but throughout history it has been about a rest from the activities of the world and enjoining activities that acknowledge our Creator. The rabbis have made so many rules concerning the Sabbath that most Jews living in the land of Israel don’t keep the Sabbath because they think that it is an impossible burden that no normal human could carry. It is not that the Sabbath is a burden, it is the rules of men concerning the Sabbath that make it a burden. So I will give you a few rules for the Sabbath.

  1. Love YHWH your Elohim with all your heart, soul, mind and strength.
  2. Do what pleases Him on the Sabbath.
  3. When you have the “perfect Sabbath day,” try to have another one the next week. I think you will find that the perfect Sabbath is a goal that we will be pursuing our entire lives.
Does your crew work on the Sabbath to produce Shabbat Night Live?

Shabbat was the busiest day in the Temple service. Yeshua taught on Shabbat, and providing this cyber-kehilah (congregation) every week and teaching the Word of the Almighty is well within our understanding of doing His pleasure on Shabbat. We have been made “priests to the world” and are fulfilling this, as did the priests doing the Temple service every Shabbat when there was a Temple.

On Shabbat, our bookstore is closed and no one is working on the day-to-day “business” aspects of the ministry. We do prepare a lot of the show and behind-the-scenes work ahead of time during the week, but Michael felt called to provide the live fellowship experience with the viewers when Shabbat begins.

In Matthew chapter 1, is Joseph the husband of Mary or the father of Mary?

Both.

Matthew gives the lineage of Yahshua through his only earthly parent, Miriam, through the lineage of King David by way of his son Solomon.  In verse 16 in most translations of the Bible, Joseph is listed as the husband of Mary, which makes Yahshua the 13th generation from the “carrying away into Babylon unto Messiah” enumerated in verse 17, and thus causes a fatal error in the enumeration of his geneaology which clearly states that he was the 14th generation.

Our modern translations come from the Greek version of Matthew.  Matthew was not written in Greek.  According to several first and second century sources, Matthew was well-known to have been written in the Hebrew language.  From Hebrew, it was translated into the more common Aramaic language, and from Aramaic it was eventually translated into Greek.  That is why many Aramaic words still remain in the Greek text and are even transmitted over into the English translations of Matthew.  The word “husband” in verse 16 is the Greek word “aner” which broadly means, “a man of full age,” and can be translated as “man,” “father,” “husband,” or any adult male.  However, the Aramaic word that was translated “aner,” is givra, which literally means “mighty man” and is commonly used to refer to the oldest man in the family clan, most appropriately translated “father.”  Thus, Miriam’s father (givra) was the son of Yosef, who was the son of Ya’acov.

Verse 19 indicates that another man named Yosef was her “ba-ala” (Aramaic for husband). This becomes very clear when we compare the genealogy of her husband Yosef which is detailed in Luke 3:23 and following.  Miriam’s husband Yosef was commonly supposed to be the father of Yahshua, but this man Yosef was the son of Heli, which was the son of Matthat, whose lineage goes back to King David as well, but through David’s son Nathan, who was not of the king line (Luke 3:31).  The Yosef whose lineage is detailed in Luke 3 is Miriam’s husband of Matthew 1:19 and was Yahshua’s stepfather – only a distant relative of Yahshua through his only earthly parent Miriam.

What is the Biblical instruction on tithing, and is it for us today?

The instruction on tithing is found in several places in the Torah, which I will attempt to consolidate. In Deut. 14:22-29 we are instructed to tithe (or “tenth”) our increase when we go “up” to celebrate the Feasts “where YHWH shall choose to put His name.”  We could bring up either the actual produce of the land, or we could sell a tenth and bring up the proceeds, and purchase anything that our “soul lusteth after” to enjoy the celebration, which could include meat, wine, and strong drink.  In verse 27 we are told to not forget the Levite, whose lot in life is to serve in the Temple and instruct people in the Torah, and who is forbidden from amassing property (Num. 18:23).  

Every third year we were to take care of the Levites, the widows, the orphans, and the strangers living among us by giving our tithe at the gate of our own individual cities, as stipulated in verses 28 and 29.  Thus we would take care of those who lacked within our own community while no doubt enjoying the festivities in Jerusalem with friends and family who are taking their tenth up to the feast that year to enjoy the celebration.  It does not make sense that everyone would be on the same 3-year schedule.

Although the scripture does not detail how the giving was regulated, we can assume that widows and orphans were not forced to wait 3 years to receive support from their community. In Numbers 19:20-32 it stipulates that the priests and Levites are to receive a tenth part of the tithe out of all the tithes and offerings.  

Malachi 3:10 gives an instruction concerning tithes that has been grossly distorted by the translators and maleficently used to manipulate the masses in Churchianity.  Some modern-day religionists strip this verse from its context in order to garner all the tithes and offerings into their own denominational coffers.  They build edifices to the glory of man while neglecting the poor, widows, orphans, and the modern-day Levites who are truly ministering the Gospel.   

The first three chapters of Malachi chide the Israelites for bringing maimed, disfigured, and otherwise unacceptable sacrifices to the Temple.  In 3:10 it continues the theme, as properly rendered from the Hebrew, “You bring all these unacceptable tithes into the storehouse and there is treif in my house!” The Hebrew usage of treif does not indicate unclean flesh, but the meat of a clean animal that is in some way polluted and unacceptable for consumption.  The prophet Malachi tells us that our tithes and offerings need to be appropriate according to the blessing that we have received from our Heavenly Father, but nowhere indicates that the instructions of the Torah for the disposition for our tithe has in any way been altered.  

The instructions from Yahshua, which are reiterated throughout the Epistles, teach us to be “givers” and to be diligent to take care of those in need and those who are ministers of the Gospel of the Kingdom.  Matthew 25:31-46 illustrates the attitude of the King toward those who neglect the needy. and in Matthew 6:19-34 the Messiah instructs his followers that giving is an act of righteousness that will be eternally rewarded.  

It is the love of money which is the root of all evil, because what you love, you can never get enough. But if we love the Kingdom and His righteousness, we will spend our lives giving and welcoming others into the Kingdom.  

I’ve heard Michael talking about the Astronomically and Agriculturally Corrected Biblical Calendar. How can I get one?

The Astronomically and Agriculturally Corrected Biblical Calendar can be purchased by clicking here.

 

Video FAQs

What is a Hanukkite?

You may have heard the term “Hanukkite” or “Chanukkite” or “Hannukite” (Depending on spelling). Michael Rood discusses where this term

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